• Panama City’s forgotten Seminole War forts

    The landscape of Florida is dotted with the sites of military outposts built by the U.S. Army during the Second Seminole War (1835-1842). Two of the least known of these stood on the shores of St. Andrew Bay in what is now Panama City. The year 1839 found the commanders of the U.S. Army in […]

  • Preview Chapter from “Fort Gaines, Georgia: A Military History”

    The following is a preview chapter from the new Seminole and Creek Wars related book – Fort Gaines, Georgia: A Military History. If you enjoy the preview, please consider purchasing the book at the bottom of the page. — CHAPTER ONE In the wake of Fort Jackson The establishment of Fort Gaines on the Chattahoochee River was a […]

  • Scott Massacre of 1817 was 199 years ago today

    Today marks the 199th anniversary of the first U.S. defeat of the Seminole Wars. A force of several hundred Red Stick Creek, Seminole and maroon (black Seminole) warriors attacked a U.S. Army supply boat under Lt. Richard W. Scott from the bank of the Apalachicola River at present-day Chattahoochee, Florida, on November 30, 1817. Scott […]

  • Battles
    Edited
    Survivors and their fates (July 28, 1816)

    The number of survivors from the explosion at Prospect Bluff continued to dwindle 200 years ago today as more of the badly wounded died from their injuries. This is the final article in a series marking the 200th anniversary of the U.S. campaign to destroy the Fort at Prospect Bluff, Florida. Please click here to […]

  • Battles
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    Eve of Destruction at Prospect Bluff (July 26, 1816)

    Volcanic ash in the atmosphere gave the sun a blood-red appearance as it rose above the Apalachicola River 200 years ago today. It was an omen of the deadly destruction that would strike the Fort at Prospect Bluff in less than 24-hours. This article is part of a series marking the 200th anniversary of the […]

  • Battles
    This lidar (laser radar) image shows the Apalachicola River at left. The slough and swamp that wrapped behind the fort are visible as "deep" areas in the right of the photos. Look closely just right of the river and you can see the faint outlines of the surviving earthworks of the fort.
    Clinch and Loomis at Bloody Bluff (July 25, 1816)

    The U.S. gunboats reached Bloody Bluff on the Apalachicola River 200 years ago today. The full-scale American assault on the Fort at Prospect Bluff (or “Negro Fort”) was now just three days away. This is part of a series marking the 200th anniversary of the U.S. attack on the Fort at Prospect Bluff. Please click […]

  • Battles
    The Fort at Prospect Bluff as drawn by a Spanish officer in 1815. Notice that the octagonal citadel and angular water battery are shown, but not the large outer entrenchment.
    Gunboats on the Apalachicola River (July 24, 1816)

    The U.S. Navy began its move up the Apalachicola River 200 years ago today on July 24, 1816. U.S. Gunboats No. 149 and No. 154 were on their way to join the fighting at Prospect Bluff (or “Negro Fort”). This is part of a series marking the 200th anniversary of the U.S. attack on the […]